Archive for January, 2013

Most of us eat more than we should, take in more toxins than we’d like, and are subjected to many other things, like pollutants, that we’d rather avoid. Furthermore, most of us carry around a lot of undigested food in our systems that comes from eating more than we can process. Essentially, a fast will flush these things from your system. Yes, you’ll lose weight. But more importantly, your body will run better than it did before

A very active time. Deep sleep is where your body works the hardest to repair itself. You need nutrients to make these repairs, but it’s better if you aren’t mucking up the process with digestion. This is why you hear that you shouldn’t eat too much at night. It’s best to eat early to allow most of the digestion to happen while you’re awake, thus allowing your body to use all its energy for recovery during sleep. It is worth noting here that it’s better to eat before bed if you need the nutrients—don’t skip them. Your body can’t repair itself without nutrients, and recovery from breakdown is why we eat in the first place.

Not really a food source but something we tend to consume. It has nearly twice the calories of proteins and carbs (though it lacks fuel) and digests rapidly. Its only healthy function is that it seems to make us happy. Studies indicate this is a good thing, as those who consume alcohol generally live longer than those who don’t, but from a purely nutritional standpoint, it’s not so hot because you’re getting calories without any upside. Its use should be strategic and regulated for best results.

Eating should not be a race. Hurrying through a meal causes you to miss most of its delicious flavors, not to mention that you’re likely to eat way more than you should. That’s because your body doesn’t recognize it’s full until twenty minutes after you’ve eaten too much. So instead, go slower. Put your phone down. Turn off the television. Chew slowly and focus on each bite, putting your fork down between them. By doing so, you’ll reach that feeling of satiety without ever feeling like you need to unloosen your belt a notch.

How much you should eat before your workout depends on the type of workout that you plan on doing: high, moderate, or low intensity. If you’re going to do a low-intensity workout, don’t eat before your workout because it will just make you feel sluggish. On the other hand, for moderate to high-intensity workouts, you’ll want to have some reserve carbs in your system to perform the best.

Here are some caloric guidelines:

  • If it’s 3 or 4 hours before your exercise, eating a large meal is OK (600 calories or more).
  • If it’s 2 or 3 hours beforehand, a smaller meal is better (400 to 500 calories).
  • If it’s 1 or 2 hours before, a liquid meal is a good choice (300 to 400 calories).
  • If it’s an hour beforehand, a small snack will do (200 to 300 calories).

    Try not to eat during the last hour before you begin a workout because it floods your system with too much blood sugar during those initial stages of your workout.

Over time, American portion sizes have enlarged to gargantuan sizes. Restaurants often provide you not with one serving of pasta, but with as many as 4 or more. But if you have a hard time not cleaning your plate—after all, the food does taste good—request that the waiter split your order in half before they bring it to the table. That way you can enjoy your dinner as lunch later in the week.

Greens are also a great option, but not all salads are created equal. Stick with salads that don’t contain mayo (in other words, avoid the tuna and chicken salad), and ask for the dressing on the side. This way you can add your tablespoon or two, instead of having your salad drenched in

By definition, an appetizer is intended to get your appetite going. But when some appetizers contain more than 1,000 calories, that’s not an appetizer—that’s a full meal and more! If you do want an appetizer, ask your table if they’d be willing to split one of the healthier options like a salad, bruschetta, ceviche, or anything that’s light on sauce and heavy on fruits, veggies, or lean protein

If you find yourself raiding the fridge at night even when you know that you’ve eaten as much as you should for the day, brush your teeth. If you’re still hungry after that, try having a cup of tea or drinking a glass of water, because thirst can often be mistaken for hunger.

If you’re still hungry after trying both of those solutions, reach for a plain protein shake.

After a hard workout, you’ve probably used up all or a lot of your body’s stored carbohydrates. To replenish them quickly, so that your body can recover in time for your next workout, it’s important to enjoy a recovery snack within 30 minutes of your workout. Your ideal recovery snack should contain 1/2 gram of carbohydrates per pound of your body weight, and at least 10 grams of protein.

A few great recovery snacks:

  • P90X Results and Recovery Formula
  • 1 percent chocolate milk
  • Granola cereal
  • Fruit smoothie
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